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National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month

October 1 - October 31

It’s aggressive, mean, and potentially life-threatening. Bullying comes in many forms, none of which are acceptable. According to a recent federal survey, nearly 20 percent of U.S. high school students reported being bullied on school property within the past year. (Fifteen percent reported cyberbullying.) So how can we help?

We can start by launching a community-wide educational effort that focuses on celebrating our differences.

October’s National Bullying Prevention Month reminds us that students, parents, teachers, and school administrators all play a role. Positive change comes as we begin to emphasize respect and inclusion on campuses across the country.

 

HOW TO OBSERVE ​NATIONAL BULLYING PREVENTION MONTH

Students: Practice empathy
Reach out to new classmates this month — especially those who appear to be struggling. Report bullying when you see it and don’t let others suffer in silence.

Teachers: Reward students who show respect
Positive reinforcement works. Students who demonstrate thoughtfulness and respect for classmates, adults, and the school itself deserve your accolades.

Administrators: Plan bullying prevention programs
Make sure parents, teachers, and students understand the problem and know how to confront it.

 

WHY ​NATIONAL BULLYING PREVENTION MONTH IS IMPORTANT

Students feel safer
That means parents worry less and teachers can focus on their work. Everyone wins when bullying stops.

A sense of teamwork
Students. Parents. Teachers. School administrators. We’re all in this together. Remember, one school principal can’t stop this problem alone.

Back-to-school has a whole new meaning
October brings fresh connections and new friendships, while setting the tone for the rest of the school year. Let’s try to confront bullying as early as possible.

Source:  National Day

 

Stop Bullying On the Spot

Incidents of school violence demonstrate that bullying can have tragic consequences for individuals, families, schools and entire communities. Bullying is painful, lasting and related to low self-esteem, suicidal thoughts, anger, and other mental and physical health problems. Because of the increased risk of suicide associated with bullying–for victims and perpetrators alike–open dialogue and support are crucial in ensuring safety for our children and teenagers. 

Download the Bullying: Tips for Parents Factsheet (PDF)

Download the Bullying: What To Do If You Are Being Bullied Factsheet (PDF)

You can find more helpful information about bullying at Stopbullying.gov

Check out this online Guide to Bullying and Cyberbullying.

Details

Start:
October 1
End:
October 31